24/11/2015

Report from the battlefield #1 - EF and DTOs

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Some time ago, I started doing code reviews of various projects for the recruitment company. It is an interesting experience and I'm learning a lot by this occasion. I also observed that some mistakes are repeated by different authors. Other are not so common but are not obvious. So I came up with the idea to start a new series of posts under the title "Report from the battlefield". In this series I'll describe my observations and findings from my reviews.

Let's start. Recently, I reviewed a project created with AngularJS + ASP.NET Web API + Entity Framework. The code was neither very good nor very bad. However, I noticed that the author decided to use a class generated from the EDMX model as DTO (Data Transfer Object). The reasoning behind this decision was simple - this class had all properties required on the client side so why not to use it. Well there are a few reasons why it is not a good idea.
  • With dedicated DTOs it is less possible that changes on the server side will affect the client side.
  • With dedicated DTOs we can easily control what will be send to the client side and in what format.
  • With dedicated DTOs the server side model can be completely different from the client side model.
  • By exposing EF classes to the client side we effectively expose the database model to the client side!
You may agree with my points or not. So, I'll give you a practical example what could happen if we use EF classes as DTOs. Let's assume that there is EDMX model with 3 types of entities:
  • Customer with Orders navigation property.
  • Orders with Customer and Products navigation properties.
  • Products with Orders navigation property.
Now we want to read only 1 customer from a database, serialize it to JSON and send the result to the client side. What could go wrong? Well, because of the navigation properties the JSON serializer that is used by ASP.NET Web API will read from the database and convert to JSON the whole graph of customers, orders and products! To be more specific, I saw 0.5 MB response which should have a few kilobytes for a very small database (it contained small dozens of records in all tables)! I can bet that in the case of a production database a response would have hundreds of megabytes.

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